UNIVERSITY of GLASGOW

Louise Jopling: A Research Project
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34

Portrait - Joseph Hatton, Esq


Date:1872  
Medium:oil?  
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Subject:portrait, male  
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Sitter:Hatton, Joseph  
Sitter Note:Joseph Hatton (1841-August 1907), editor of “The Gentleman’s Magazine; funeral Times 2 August 1907 at Marylebone Cemetery E. Finchley; Helen Howard daughter of Joseph Hatton of 49 Grove-end Rd [?] married the artist William Henry Margetson(1861-1940) on 20 June 1889 (Times, 25 June 1889); she died 24 October 1955 a Reading, Times, 25 October 1955; Helen Howard Hatton b. 1860 was an artist, illustrator, flower fairies and the like; their daughter Hester Margetson (1890-1963) illustrated postcards 1924-1939.  

 

History

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Sale Provenance:Sold for £5 [1872]  
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Bibliography

Reviews:  
Jopling 1925 Quote:'After my return, my friend, Willert Beale, whom I had met at my husband’s cousins’, the Williamses, brought Joseph Hatton, the editor of “The Gentleman’s Magazine,” to have his portrait painted. Mr. Beale was an amateur painter himself, and was intensely interested in each phase of a picture. He would stand behind my chair, with his hands on the back of it, and watch each stroke that I made. For a young beginner, this is a paralysing experience, especially when the onlooker hums some well-known air, in a spasmodic manner, as Willert was fond of doing. However, I could have forgiven him this if he had not at the same time leant on the back of my chair, which gave me an odd sensation – as if a magnetic current passed from the onlooker’s hand down my spine, which glued me to my chair, and paralysed my arms. Unwilling to tell Willert not to touch my chair, I bore with it, and this fight against outward influences served me in good stead in later years, when I could paint a head before twenty or thirty students without a trace of self-consciousness. I feel I owe this to dear Willert Beale’s annoying habit.' Jopling 1925 chap. 2  
Other Quotations:  
Other Published Sources:Jopling 1925 list  
Unpublished Sources:Grattan NB PLJ