UNIVERSITY of GLASGOW

Louise Jopling: A Research Project
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4

Adèle


Date:1868  
Medium:drawing, red chalk  
Size (cms):  
Size (ins):  
Signature:  
Inscription:  
Frame:  
Collection:  
Accession No:  

 

Subject:figure, female  
Place:  
Sitter:Romer, Louise or sister  
Sitter Note:Goode, Louise? D. of Captain Fred?  

 

History

Exhibited:Salon 1868 (cat. no. 3278)  
Further Exhibitions:Paris: Salon 1868  
Sale Provenance:sold 1868?  
Alternative Title:  
Note:  

 

Bibliography

Reviews:  
Jopling 1925 Quote:'In the February of ’69 I lost a beloved brother. I felt that I could not go and listen to the usual chaff and fun that went on amongst us all at the Atelier, so I stayed at home for a few days. There, I did two heads in sanguine – one from myself and one from my sister, who was living with me. When I returned, I summoned up courage to show them to Monsieur Chaplin, who said: “They must go to the Salon.” Imagine my delight! I looked for sympathy from my fellow-students, but, instead, I heard the scarcely modulated voice of one, information those nearest to her: “It is all very well for people to come to an Atelier, and pretend that they are beginners, whilst all the time,” etc. etc. Not pleasant to hear, but my philosophical soul told me that those aspersions on my character were compliments to my work. To my joy, my drawings were accepted, and hung on the line. I was a proud woman when I received a ticket for the Vernissage. The French, with true politeness, include a friend in the invitation, so that a shy exhibitor has no occasion to feel lost amongst a crowd of strangers. The Vernissage includes the Private View, and it is far more amusing than when they are held separately. One sees celebrated artists, accompanied, perhaps, by their favourite models; the rapins du Louvre who make a living by copying Old Masters; famous actresses surrounded by an admiring crowd; and all of fashion and beauty in the two worlds, the haut and the demi-monde. I remember well that first day. In spite of my little success, I was plunged in black despair. The result fell so short of my ambition. Should I ever do anything better? Was I pursuing an ignis fatuus? I suppose that every one feels like that after any little achievement. The sole pleasure lies in the striving after success, not in the success itself.'  
Other Quotations:'done from Alice Goode. Left in Paris. Exhibited at Salon' (Grattan NB ADAP, p. 2)  
Other Published Sources:Jopling 1925 list  
Unpublished Sources:Grattan NB ADAP